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20121206
20121206
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the u.s. outpost in benghazi, libya, as it was happening. lawmakers watching itenned a now telling us what they saw today at a classified briefing on capitol hill. inside "the fox report." stay with us. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they help cover some of the expenses medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to find out more, request your free decision guide. call or go online today. after all, when you're going the distance, it's nice to have the experience and commitment to go along with you. keep dreaming. keep doing. go long. neation's third largest bank laying off thousands of em
he had, he kept at it. then after he got out of that one he starts talking about benghazi and all this other stuff and lost that one argument. could he have won if he said, i'm the guy you need for this job. >> part, you need to go back and show why the policies were going to work. for example, if you take a look at 2003 bush tax cuts, by 2007, $800 billion more revenue had come in and the deficit was cut from $370 billion to $260 billion. did you hear him say that? that's what he needed to do, full-throated defense of republican policies that bush implemented but also he could have used to show why his policies would work. ultimately when you make it a referendum, you take the arguments off the table. >> do you buy that he should have defended all the republican policies of bush and his own? >> no, because those policies got us in trouble in 2008 in a great many ways. bush inherited a surplus and left with a massive deficit. didn't monitor the financial system and so on. the most important point is david's right about, which is there's no such thing as a presidential referendum e
that's been appointed to review what happened in benghazi, libya, on 9/11 of this year, he is on an advisory board at the state department and one at the cia. so clearly, this man has got important matters on his desk. how exposed could we be if the chinese have access to all of his writings? >> very exposed. and this is nothing new. if you take a look at a typical burglar and he wants to break into a yard and has this hardened lock on a fence that he cannot cut through, what is he going to do? he's going to cut the chain. we're not going to go after a facility that spends billions of our tax dollars on securing their networks. we're going to go after somebody who works outside, somebody who has access to internal resources. it's called a u-turn attack. what they do is they find that weak link such as a home computer or a personal computer belonging to a former admiral or cia agent, and they attack that. they get access to that, and then they use their vpn connection inbound to get access to the same resources he would have access to or she would have access to based on the
watched al qaeda elements able to destroy our or damage severely our consulate in benghazi and kill four brave americans. the message has to be sent that the united states is in engaged and that the united states is ready to be involved and the united states is ready to do whatever is necessary to prevent an act that could endanger or take the lives of literally thousands and thousands of innocent people. >> thanks, john. we have reached a grave moment in the war that's raging in syria now for 20 months. and it's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the si
in benghazi. it was involved in attacks and planned attacks in europe. a lot of people forget they tried, actually in the 1990s to fly a plane in the eiffel tower much like what happened in new york on 9/11. so it's a very, virulent group that certainly threatens us and our allies. jenna: your expertise on this, peter, what do you think about our military intervention? we'll explain what that means in a moment. what do you think about us getting involved here? is this a good decision now with the tiling? what your thoughts? >> we need to recognize the threat and we need to prepare to do something but we need to really prepare the terrain. i'm very concerned that we're rushing into something that's very half-baked. the african force that is talked about is a little over 3300 men. which is a laughable amount when you're talking about an area the size of texas. it is not a serious force. so they need our help. they need some training but they're not adequate. so until there's really commitment to put a force in there, that can actually do something, we run the risk of jumping into something
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)